June 3, 2011

Trends in Cognitive Sciences: Table of Contents June 2011

The June issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences is available online.

Volume 15, Issue 6, pp. 241-288
Letters
Letters Response
Book Review
Opinion
Review

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June 1, 2011

Consciousness and Cognition: Table of Contents June 2011

cognition,journal,reviews — alice @ 7:55 pm

The June issue of Consciousness and Cognition is available online.

Volume 20, Issue 2, pp.173-488

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May 5, 2011

Trends in Cognitive Sciences: Table of Contents May 2011

The May issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences is available online.

Volume 15, Issue 5, pp. 185-240
Letters
Letters Response
Opinion
Review
Feature Review

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April 4, 2011

Trends in Cognitive Sciences: Table of Contents April 2011

The April issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences is available online.

Volume 15, Issue 4, pp. 141-184

Update – Forum: Science & Society

Opinion

Review

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March 14, 2011

Consciousness and Cognition: Table of Contents March 2011

cognition,journal,reviews — alice @ 2:53 pm

The March issue of Consciousness and Cognition is available online.

Volume 20, Issue 1, pp.1-172

Special issue: Brain and Self: Bridging the Gap

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March 6, 2011

Trends in Cognitive Sciences: Table of Contents March 2011

cognition,journal,reviews — alice @ 10:20 pm

The March issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences is available online.

Volume 15, Issue 3, pp. 95-140

Book Review

Opinion

Review

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February 22, 2011

Trends in Cognitive Sciences: Table of Contents February 2011

cognition,journal,reviews — alice @ 12:15 am

The February issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences is available online

Volume 15, Issue 2, pp. 47-94

Review

 

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February 17, 2011

Emotional processing in anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex

A. Etkinsend, T. Egner, R. Kalisch
Article in Trends in Cognitive Sciences

Abstract
Negative emotional stimuli activate a broad network of brain regions, including the medial prefrontal (mPFC) and anterior cingulate (ACC) cortices. An early influential view dichotomized these regions into dorsal–caudal cognitive and ventral–rostral affective subdivisions. In this review, we examine a wealth of recent research on negative emotions in animals and humans, using the example of fear or anxiety, and conclude that, contrary to the traditional dichotomy, both subdivisions make key contributions to emotional processing. Specifically, dorsal–caudal regions of the ACC and mPFC are involved in appraisal and expression of negative emotion, whereas ventral–rostral portions of the ACC and mPFC have a regulatory role with respect to limbic regions involved in generating emotional responses. Moreover, this new framework is broadly consistent with emerging data on other negative and positive emotions.

Click here for the full article.

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February 7, 2011

Trends in Neuroscience: Table of Contents February 2011

journal,neuroscience,reviews — alice @ 4:04 pm

The February issue of Trends in Neuroscience is available online

Volume 34, Issue 2, pp. 51-112

Opinion

Review

Feature Review

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November 17, 2008

BOOK: Frontiers of consciousness — The Chichele lectures

books,reviews,theory — thomasr @ 10:31 am

Frontiers of ConsciousnessIn recent years consciousness has become a significant area of study in the cognitive sciences. The ‘Frontiers of Consciousness‘ is a major interdisciplinary exploration of consciousness. The book stems from the Chichele lectures held at All Souls College in Oxford, and features contributions from a ‘who’s who’ of authorities from both philosophy and psychology. The result is a truly interdisciplinary volume, which tackles some of the biggest and most impenetrable problems in consciousness.

The book includes chapters considering the apparent explanatory gap between science and consciousness, our conscious experience of emotions such as fear, and of willed actions by ourselves and others. It looks at subjective differences between two ways in which visual information guides behaviour, and scientific investigation of consciousness in non-human animals. It looks at the challenges that the mind-brain relation presents for clinical practice as well as for theories of consciousness. The book draws on leading research from philosophy, experimental psychology, functional imaging of the brain, neuropsychology, neuroscience, and clinical neurology.

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October 26, 2008

Attention regulation and monitoring in meditation

attention,emotions,meditation,reviews — alice @ 12:41 am

Antoine Lutz, Heleen A. Slagter, John D. Dunne and Richard J. Davidson
Review article in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, click here for full article

Abstract:
Meditation can be conceptualized as a family of complex emotional and attentional regulatory training regimes developed for various ends, including the cultivation of well-being and emotional balance. Among these various practices, there are two styles that are commonly studied. One style, focused attention meditation, entails the voluntary focusing of attention on a chosen object. The other style, open monitoring meditation, involves nonreactive monitoring of the content of experience from moment to moment. The potential regulatory functions of these practices on attention and emotion processes could have a long-term impact on the brain and behavior.

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February 2, 2007

On becoming aware of what you eat

perception,reviews,theory — thomasr @ 7:42 pm

plate_food.jpgA recent review article explores how we become aware of the (integrated) flavor of food. Abstract: In recent years, progress has been made understanding the neural correlates of consciousness. Experimental and computational data have been largely based on the visual system. Contemporary neurobiological frameworks of consciousness are reviewed, concluding that neural reverberation among forward- and back-projecting neural ensembles across brain areas is a common theme.

In an attempt to extrapolate these concepts to the oral-sensory and olfactory systems involved with multimodal flavor perception, the integration of the sensory information of which into a flavor gestalt has been reviewed elsewhere. The neurocognitive bases of human multimodal food perception: Sensory integration. I reconceptualize the flavor-sensory system by integrating it into a larger neural system termed the Homeostatic Interoceptive System (HIS). This system consists of an oral (taste, oral touch, etc.) and non-oral part (non oral-thermosensation, pain, etc.) which are anatomically and functionally highly similar. Consistent with this new concept and with a large volume of experimental data, I propose that awareness of intraoral food is related to the concomitant reverberant self-sustained activation of a coalition of neuronal subsets in agranular insula and orbitofrontal cortex (affect, hedonics) and agranular insula and perirhinal cortex (food identity), as well as the amygdala (affect and identity) in humans. I further discuss the functional anatomy in relation essential nodes. These formulations are by necessity to some extent speculative.

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December 19, 2006

New issue of Psyche: Rosenberg

journal,reviews,theory — thomasr @ 10:36 am

header-greek.gifA new issue of Psyche is out, focusing on the work of Gregg Rosenberg. It is a special issue focusing on consciousness, causation and the links to the physical structure of the brain.

Rosenberg has a page about the book, with several of the key chapters available online.

In fact, for those wanting a quick overview of his theory, he’s put together some PowerPoint slides which explain the key points in nine easy steps.

The new edition of Psyche examines Rosenberg’s arguments in some detail, as the link between consciousness and brain function, and the causal role of mental phenomena are two of the most important and difficult parts of modern consciousness research (from MindHacks)

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April 3, 2006

Art and the Conscious Brain

SCR Feature,reviews — thomasr @ 10:00 am
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March 3, 2006

New reviews from Metapsychology Online

reviews — thomasr @ 6:14 am

Metapsychology Online has recently published several book reviews. Here we link to the most relevant articles.

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January 31, 2006

Are animals self-aware?

SCR Feature,reviews — virgil @ 7:00 pm
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December 27, 2005

Information Integration Theory of Consciousness

SCR Feature,reviews — thomasr @ 11:29 pm
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November 22, 2005

Dreaming: Two book reviews

SCR Feature,reviews — thomasr @ 2:54 pm
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September 4, 2005

Radical Nature

SCR Feature,reviews — thomasr @ 5:08 am
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December 21, 2004

Re: The Quest for Consciousness

SCR Feature,reviews — thomasr @ 7:45 pm
Re: Quest for Consciousness
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